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Car Care Tips

According to recent studies, 5% of all motor vehicle fatalities are caused by automobile maintenance neglect. The following simple and inexpensive preventive checks will greatly extend the life of the vehicle, ensure safer operation, and even benefit the environment.

Always consult your owner’s manual, but a good rule of thumb is to have the oil filter changed regularly, every 3,000 miles.

Have all fluids checked, including brake, power steering, transmission/transaxle, windshield washer solvent, and antifreeze. These fluids play a large role in the safety and performance of the vehicle.

Check tire inflation. Under-inflated tires can result in a loss of fuel efficiency. This is the least expensive form of preventive and safety maintenance. Tires should be checked once a month.

Keep your engine tuned. A fouled spark plug or plugged/restricted fuel injector can reduce fuel efficiency as much as 30%.

Have the chassis lubricated frequently. This step extends the life of the moving components of the vehicle's suspension system.

Check battery cables and posts for corrosion, and clean them as needed. The battery fluid should also be checked and filled if it is low, except in the case of maintenance-free batteries.

Have the lighting system checked frequently, including headlights, turn signals, and brake and tail lights.

Check windshield washer blades for cracks, tears, and windshield contact. Replace them approximately once a year or sooner if streaking begins.

Inspect engine belts regularly. Worn belts will affect the engine performance. Look for cracks and missing sections or segments.

Have the air filtration system checked frequently. The air filter should be checked approximately every other oil change for clogging or damage. This system ensures that the vehicle is performing at its peak condition.

Always consult the vehicle owner's manual for individual service schedules as manufacturer maintenance requirements vary greatly.

11 Gas Saving Tips

Fill up with a lower-octane gasoline. Buy the lowest grade or octane of gasoline that is appropriate for your car. Unless your car requires premium gasoline, filling up your car with high-octane fuel is a waste of money. That pricey premium fuel won't boost your car's fuel economy or performance in the least, so skip it. If you're not sure what grade of fuel works best for your car, open up your owner's manual and take a look. As long as your engine doesn't knock or ping when you fuel up with regular unleaded, you're good to drive on this much cheaper gas. Passing on pricey premium gasoline could save you hundreds of dollars a year.

Don't top off. Don't bother topping off when filling your car's gas tank. Any additional gas is just going to slop around or seep out. Why waste your money paying for gas your car won't use? Stop pumping at the first indication that your tank is full when the automatic nozzle clicks off.

Tighten up that gas cap. Gas will evaporate from your car's gas tank if it has an escape. Loose, missing or damaged gas caps cause 147 million gallons of gas to evaporate each year, according to the Car Care Council. So be sure to tighten up that gas cap each time you fuel up your car.

Go for the shade. The hot summer sun that makes the inside of your car feel like a sauna also zaps fuel from your gas tank.

"If you let your car bake in the sun there's going to be a greater amount of evaporative emissions that take place than if you park in the shade," says Jim Kliesch, research associate at the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy and vehicle analyst for GreenerCars.com.

So park your car in the shade of a building or tree whenever possible. And buy a good windshield shade. A windshield shade blocks sunlight and helps to keep heat out of the inside of your car.

Use your garage for your car. Got a garage? Clear it out and make room for your car. Parking in your garage will help your car stay warm in winter and cool in summer, and you won't have to depend as much on your gas-guzzling air-conditioning or defroster when you drive.

Pump up your tires. Don't get caught driving on under inflated tires. Under inflated tires wear down more quickly and they also lower your car's gas mileage.

"Tires that have low pressure offer more resistance so the engine is going to work harder to keep the car at 60," says Brian Moody, road test editor at Edmunds.com.

Your car's gas mileage may plummet by as much as 15 percent. Driving on under inflated tires may also reduce the life of your tires by 15 percent or more.

Check your tire pressure once a month. Buy a digital gauge and keep it in your glove box. Compare the pressure in your tires with the recommended pressure listed in your owner's manual and on the placard in your car door. Then inflate your tires as needed. Be sure to check tire pressure when your tires are cold. A good time is early in the morning after your car's been idle overnight.

Keep your engine in tune. Fixing a car that is out of tune or has failed an emissions test can boost gas mileage by about 4 percent. So be sure to give your car regular tune-ups. You'll also want to watch out for worn spark plugs. A misfiring spark plug can reduce a car's fuel efficiency by as much as 30 percent.

Replace air filters. Keep a close eye on your engine's air filter. When the engine air filter clogs with dirt, dust and bugs, it causes your engine to work harder and your car becomes less fuel-efficient. Replacing a clogged air filter could improve your gas mileage by as much as 10 percent and save you 15 cents a gallon. It's a good idea to have your engine air filter checked at each oil change. The Car Care Council recommends changing your car's air and oil filters every three months or 3,000 miles or as specified in your owner's manual.

Use the right oil. You can improve your car's gas mileage by 1 percent to 2 percent by using the manufacturer's recommended grade of motor oil.

Don't skimp on maintenance. Be serious about auto care. Your car's performance depends on it.

"Always follow the manufacturer-recommended maintenance," Moody says. "The car's designed to run a certain way. If you neglect it, it won't be as efficient."

New Paint Care Guide

Hand Wash:

It is recommended that you never drive your newly painted car through a automated car wash unless it is a "touch-less" system. The spinning brush type tend to be hard on the fresh paint and can cause marking and possible damage to the newly painted surface.

Avoid water spotting:

Hard water spots can dry and cause permanent stains to newly painted surfaces as well as existing, which is not covered under our warranty. The best way to avoid water spotting is to wash your vehicle away from direct sunlight, and try to keep your vehicle away from sprinklers, as this is the most common way we see water spotting happening to a vehicle.

Use Car Soap:

It is never a good idea to use any household soaps or detergents on your vehicle. These products contain ingredients that are hard on your vehicles painted surfaces, especially those areas that have been recently refinished. Instead, use soaps that are specifically designed for vehicle use.

Wax and Specialty Sealants:

Waxes and specialty protectants should not applied to the newly painted surface for at least 60 days after your vehicle has been returned to you.